Tag Archives: herbalism

Healing on the Highways and By-ways (61)

bxccbghzplhcgsrasumofm.com Phoenix Rising 2In 1993, Bryan went to Queensland on a company excursion.  He phoned me to rave about how beautiful it was and, although we didn’t realise it at the time, it was as if this visit was a flag for changes which would come to us in the following year.

But while I was on my own that weekend, I came a hell of a cropper on our front porch which was made of raw bricks. I managed to smash my new glasses and the force of the fall left me with slight concussion for the rest of the weekend. Although I thought I’d recovered okay, I started having severe headaches again, not migraines but intense pain on the right side of my head. This led me to another alternative therapy, interestingly via some other treatment I was getting at the time for a painful back which had also got worse after the fall.

I had come across the homeopathic practitioner quite by chance when I was walking through Fremantle and came across a heap of people sitting on the stairs of the Mall and chattering among each other. “What’s going on here”, I asked, out of curiosity. “We’re waiting to see the homeopath who works in this office”, a young woman replied. “He does give us appointment times but he never sticks to them, so we just queue until we see him. He reckons the inter-action out here is part of the healing process.”

Ever curious, I decided to join the waiting queue and see what homeopathy was about as I’d vaguely read about it in one of the growing number of books I was accumulating on alternative health practices. I do have to say that the homeopath seemed pretty whacko to my still conservative outlook. He came from a very traditional medical background, but he was definitely very eccentric. He had quit the teaching hospital he’d worked at in the UK when he wasn’t allowed to practise homeopathy. He’d check your tongue, pulse and skin colour, then prescribe some homeopathic drops, make up a bottle of the drops, bang it a number of times against a Bible, then send you on your way. Interestingly, though, over a few weeks my spinal pain improved and I began to feel a whole heap better.

But after the fall in front of our home, I felt I needed something else to deal with the headaches. As I was seated in the waiting room, I noticed a sign advertising cranial-osteopathy and decided to give it a go.

I met an amazing woman who eased the headaches in the first session. It was quite extraordinary. She tuned into my body and made what felt like incredibly minute adjustments. I got up off the massage table and felt lighter, a bit dizzy and in far less pain. This was my introduction to cranio-sacral therapy.

Shortly after my first couple of treatments, I was eating in a restaurant and a friend commented that I didn’t eat a lot, and I realised he was watching what I ate as a commentary on my weight.  He also let slip that a couple of other people had made similar observations (she doesn’t eat a lot, how come she’s overweight) and I was absolutely furious.  If there’s one thing that really gets to me, it’s knowing people have talked about me behind my back.  It goes back to my childhood when I felt on the outer in my family, and on the outer at both primary and grammar schools.

When I went back for another cranio-sacral massage,  Gilda touched me then said: “What on Mo, Kyogle, editedearth has happened?  All my work feels completely undone.”  I told her what had happened and the anger I felt. She said she could feel it raging in my body, so with a sigh, went to work to release all the tight feelings. It took a few more treatments but my headaches were gone and I felt heaps lighter. My body loved it then and still loves it. As I now have fibromyalgia, I can’t tolerate deep massage but somehow this therapy brings me back to centre in my body and relieves a lot of pain.

I do believe  that healing isn’t an instant process. It can involve lots of therapies or just one, but it’s a matter of trial and error, tuning in to what happens for you, what works or what doesn’t, and trusting your intuitive response. No one therapeutic path is correct for everyone or will work for everyone. It’s the beauty of this world that there are so many alternative therapies, which offer a rich smorgasbord for a person to experiment with and work towards the best possible healing results.

Each time I’ve worked with a cranio-sacral therapist, the approach has been different. Gilda, in Perth, worked with past lives as she gently adjusted my body. In Ipswich, Queensland, I worked with a lady who asked me tentatively if I’d ever been exposed to extra-terrestrial energies. I guess she asked tentatively because you never know how people are going to react. But I knew what she was talking about.

I’d been in a psychic development group and, during one guided visualisation session, I’d suddenly had an out-of-body experience. I found myself floating in the air and facing Mt Barney, a huge, magical mountain in the Border Ranges mountain range south of Boonah. As I hung there, suspended in the clear, cool air, the mountain broke open and a being came out and hurtled towards me. We both screamed “Oh, no!” seconds before we collided. And then I found myself back in my body feeling utterly drained.

The therapist’s words brought it all back and she looked very relieved when I didn’t scream and bolt out of her treatment room, but nodded. “You are completely dried up”, she said, “As if you’ve had a bolt of electricity go through you and fry everything in your body.” On this occasion, it took a few treatments but I felt heaps better than when I’d first stretched out on the massage table.

I also came across Ka Huna massage when I was living in Boonah, Queensland.  Again, I love this massage as all the practitioners I’ve encountered seem to sense just how much pressure I can take on my body – with fibromyalgia you get really sensitive to pain. I can’t bear the slightest pressure on my bones and I certainly can’t tolerate deep tissue massage any more.

I’ve worked with my herbalist friend to support my body nutritionally and with the support of herbs and vitamins. She is brilliant and has given me very kind, loving support which has helped no end in handling fibromyalgia and its various manifestations in a more holistic way than the medical profession. Even though medicos do their best, there are limitations in conventional medicines which can often be addressed by alternative practices.

In 2009 I experienced incredibly high temperatures in Traralgon, Victoria, when bushfires killed nearly 200 people. On the Saturday we reached 47C and it was if I became sensitised to the heat. When we moved to Bowraville, on the mid-north coast of New  South Wales, I got heatstroke the first day we moved in, with a blood pressure reading of 220/165 and a pulse of 40.  The ambulance officers thought I was going to have a major stroke and die, but somehow I survived. It left me with high blood pressure though: 165/105.  I didn’t want to take blood pressure tablets so went to see an acupuncturist who had trained in China.  Within a couple of months my blood pressure stabilised at 135/75.

In the UK, I was doing Tarot readings in a New Age tent at a community fair. The day before, I suddenly got a voice in my head telling me to charge only £5. I listen to these little cosmic hints so, with an eye to Feng Shui principles, on the first day I set up facing the entrance with a big sign saying; “10 minute Tarot readings – £5”. It was on for one and old. I never stopped and, as it turned out, no-one had more than £5, because they hadn’t realised the New Age tent was in operation. I thoroughly enjoyed myself as everyone I saw needed a reading and everything went like clockwork.

For me, it was a lesson in listening to that inner voice, which can be whatever it means to you. It’s like a whisper from the spirit world. But you can call it god, spirit, the light, your inner wisdom, your higher self, your goddess or whatever has resonance for you. It seems to me there are no fixed ways to approach the matter of spiritual guidance and you need to go with whatever flows for you, not just adopt one particular approach because someone else uses it.

As it happened, another Tarot reader there had a sign for readings at £25 a pop, and had no business at all. She maintained a fixed position of being a “professional tarot reader” and was quite inflexible on price. She was also incredibly ratty that I was “undercutting” her price. It was all well and good to insist on her professional credentials, but the rigid adherence to this was absolutely useless in the real world where no-one had £25 for a reading. Every person I spoke to mentioned they had just £5 spare and, to be very truthful, I really didn’t stick to the 10-minute sign. I enjoy Tarot reading and I keep going until I feel I’ve provided, as far as possible, the information and advice a person needs. As it happened, I know that I was able to offer support to a few people in real need who found what I had to very useful, and really that’s the purpose of spiritual work.

The experience at that New Age fair taught me the important of listening to those “off-world” voices and to be flexible in my approach. I’m very glad I followed the cosmic advice, because I had a wonderful time and met some gutsy, warm, fantastic people.

On the Sunday, though, I was very tired as I’d done heaps of readings the previous day. Early on a man walked in and set up a massage table. He had a lovely energy around him and I wandered over to see what he did. Cranio-sacral therapy! Wooo-hooo. I was up on that table like greased lightning, no-one else got a look in!  The therapist held my feet and immediately tuned in to the grief I was experiencing in leaving my father behind in Australia. In that, and subsequent sessions, he restored my body to balance, and further cemented cranio-sacral therapy as my favourite form of body treatment.

I should add that, from the time I first learned Reiki in 1994 and went on to Reiki Master level, this form of energy healing has also contributed to the healing I’ve received over the years. It is also a therapy which, because it is so gentle, is one which my body can handle with ease.

I still work with various therapies such as crystal healing, Reiki, massage, cranio-sacral healing, reflexology as and when I feel they’re appropriate. As I said in an earlier post, I work with conventional medicine too, as and when that is appropriate. Each person’s path to healing is like a smorgasbord – you need to have tasters and sort out what sorts you.

Of course, some might comment that I still have fibromyalgia and I do get the occasional intense headache, but nowhere near as bad as the migraines I used to get.  When I first started working with alternative healing therapies, I used to believe that the goal was to cure the illness. I’ve since come to realise that healing relates to something much deeper – coming into alignment with our inner self, our souls, our divine journey, our relationships with others, a profound sense of the spiritual bringing us peace of mind, if not peace of body.

One of the reasons I came to wonder about what lies behind illness and how people cope was a book I read of a lady who became ill with multiple sclerosis.   She had the means to travel and experience many therapies, but never recovered from the MS. She then realised that her skills could be put to use to work with MS organisations in fund-raising and structural development, something which never would have crossed her mind had she not got MS. And in the process she was of enormous help to other MS sufferers.

Fibromyalgia has taught me to slow down, take life more easily and to understand that it has given me a profound gift: having time to smell the roses, lean against beautiful trees and feel their energy, looking closely at autumn leaves and seeing their beauty, taking time to sit with our dogs and feel their warmth and love, to hug my husband and enjoy cuddles with him, to value my friends, to realise that life isn’t about doing big things (although that’s possible) but to realise that life is a gift. Don’t waste it – joy and beauty are all around you if you take the time to stop looking elsewhere and look at where you are right now.

 

Rest & Recreation – Another Kidney Infection

I had a flare-up of fibromyalgia at the end of last week complete with the Glums which is where you wake up feeling like you’re at the bottom of a dark pit with no way out. The only way out of this is sit back, relax, tell yourself “This too will pass” and eventually you wake up one day wondering why the hell you felt such darkness and despair. Experience helps weather these storms!

However, I’ve ended up with another kidney infection which I’m treating with antibiotic, home-made lemon barley water, various supplements and homeopathic remedies.

I’ve decided this is a wake-up call to take far better care of myself and have a complete break and rest for the rest of the week, at least until Friday.

Thanks for your patience and, hopefully, understanding.  Back in due course – ciao, hasta la vista!

Dark Night of the Soul 1 (19)

The Dark Night of the Soul comes from a poem written by Saint John of the Cross, a 16th-centure Spanish poet. It refers to the journey into Hades where you enter a realm of darkness, where you learn humility and where you re-emerge blinking into the light, a different person, wondering why the hell your life suddenly descended into chaos, hard times and inner darkness.

Both I and my husband experienced this hell on wheels when we lived up Mt French and it is not something I ever, ever want to through again. I remember just after we’d staggered into a lighter part of our lives – when we sold our Mt French home and moved down into the centre of Boonah – reading an article by a woman talking blithely about dark nights of the soul, how wonderful they were and hey, bring on the next one. And I remember thinking clearly at the time that she had no idea what a real dark night of the soul is because, once you’ve gone through one, you don’t ever want to return to that dark time of your life where tempestuous swirls tear your life apart and you feel you’re in a whirlpool of sadness, pain and despair from which there is no escape.

The purpose for me, however, is that spiritual demands are at work on you. It’s a bit like being in a spin dryer where all the dross gets tossed out and you are cleansed and on a different path as well as transformed into a different person – one more aligned with your soul purpose once you’ve lost the layers grafted on you by parents and society as you move through life.A Portal to the Stars & Life

What could go wrong in our home in Boonah went wrong. Prior to moving into our new home and while we were still staying in a motel, I ended up with a really painful toothache. I needed a root canal filling which took a bit of a chunk out of our savings. But after we moved in, things really started going downhill.

No power – no water

I first found out that there are drawbacks to living on a somewhat remote property with tanks and no town water on the morning I was due to pop down into Boonah to sign the final contract of sale.  I turned on the tap. No water. Our furniture and boxes from Perth had arrived on the Wednesday and we’d done some solid unpacking so we were dirty, dusty and unkempt. And I couldn’t have a wash or shower.  I ended up dipping a piece of tissue into half a glass of water on the bedside table and using that to try to restore some semblance of normality and not look like the Wild Woman of Borneo when I went into the solicitor’s office.

So that was our first experience living outside a city.  When the power goes off, the pump that gets the water into your home doesn’t work and you don’t have water coming out of the taps which, as city slickers, we were used to.  Bryan had to climb on the top of the really big tank, take the top off and fish out a bucket of water. What we also found out was that when the local power supply company was going to do maintenance work and shut off power supply, it didn’t let you know the power was going to go off. You had to buy the local paper to find out. And, of course, we hadn’t even had time to find out that a local newspaper existed, let alone read it.

Bryan got the property fenced within the week (more money out of our savings) and finished off that work while I was driving to pick up our mutts from kennels north of Brisbane, as I mentioned in a previous post. Rosie, our Jack Russell, made herself at home straight away, but if you take cats to a new home, you need to keep them indoors. Our three cats were curious and sniffed around, but then I noticed that Mr Smudge, who was around nine years old and neutered, was trying to urinate but couldn’t. More drama.

I phoned the vet – this was a Saturday afternoon so out of hours and, of course, more expensive – and he told me to get Mr Smudge to the surgery urgently as he likely had a blocked urinary duct which, of course, was an emergency.  The rest of the afternoon was spent with me helping the very kind vet sedate the cat, pull his penis out and unblock it. Ever tried it?  Difficult, I can assure you! More money out of the coffers but at least our dear, kind old cat survived.

Bryan couldn’t find work so we ended up on unemployment benefits.  When he did finally get casual work, the drought broke, the main road out was flooded, he couldn’t get to work so his pay as a casual worker plummeted. We decided to fill the smaller water tank and it broke at the bottom just as all the water had been delivered by the tanker and poured in. We lost all the water and I think we felt real despair as we watching the water promptly pour out again – more money wasted plus we lost our back-up tank and had no money to replace it.

Getting Daisy, our oldest cat, treated for paralysis ticks took another bite out of our savings and, as we were then on unemployment benefits and on the breadline, our savings went down relentlessly. Sadly, although Daisy survived, she was a bit more frail and a few months later, late one evening, we found her dead under one of our bushes. Whether it was the result of the ticks or she got bitten by a snake, we don’t know.  She looked very peaceful and we  buried her in our garden the next day.

The Father from Hell

Finally my father arrived from Perth. When we were thinking of moving to Queensland, I asked him if he’d like to move too as I didn’t want to leave him alone after my mother died in 1987. He agreed eagerly and his household effects travelled with ours from Western Australia to Queensland. But he took ages to decide to move to the Eastern States and dithered and dithered. He eventually got around to taking the plunge, flew over and we met him at Brisbane Airport. But I was to find out that Dad had become a “gunnadoo” – always going to do this or do that and nothing ever got done in the end.

Our arrangement had been that we would buy a block big enough for him to build a home and he would pay a proportionate amount towards the cost of the block. When Dad did arrive, he hadn’t sold his house which wasn’t surprising, it was in a good state inside but when people saw the swimming pool – filled with water plants, huge goldfish and filthy dirty – the buyers took off like long dogs. And, of course, he had no money to pay for a new home or towards the cost of our block.

The decision we made to choose to live together until Dad’s property in WA sold was one of the most stupid I have ever taken.  Both Bryan and my father were used to being top dog, and my father not only didn’t take kindly to not being in charge in our home, he was also hitting the booze hard most of the day.

I knew that my father had had an alcohol problem prior to my mother’s death in 1987 and it got worse once he was on his own.  I never went down to Rockingham to see him in the afternoon as he would be drunk. I had thought things might have improved by the time he came to Queensland but that was wishful thinking.  I learned to dread his words: “Sun’s over the yard arm, time for a whiskey” which would be about 11 in the morning. And when my father drank, he was an aggressive, bullying drunk.  Evenings were a nightmare and the arguments got worse and worse.

Tearing Down Walls...The Way of the Heart

Tearing Down Walls, the Way of the Heart

We had agreed with Dad that he’d contribute a share to the cost of the block and then build his own, smaller house on the block. But when, eventually, he sold his house he made it clear that he intended to dole out his money in small amounts, as and when he chose, to control us. Dad had always tried, and sometimes succeeded, to control people with money. He wanted us – his daughter and son-in-law – to dance to his tune and he took pleasure in trying to pull the strings. I can say now that I should have realised this, but I never thought he would do the dirty on us so cynically and deliberately.

One evening we ended up having a monster row when my father started threatening Bryan. Luckily, my husband was able to keep his cool and walk away from the difficult situation.  A couple of days’ later my father moved out and left us pretty much destitute. I told him this and I can still see the malicious look of glee on his face which confirmed that he knew this full well and didn’t give a tinker’s cuss.

And do you know what? I was silly enough to keep trying to make my relationship with him work.  What a bloody idiot!  So here are a couple of life lessons: 1) don’t mix your money with that of relatives, it can create enormous headaches. Since then I’ve heard horror stories of relatives falling out over money so you never know, you may need to read this blog just for the one lesson of keeping your money and your relatives’ money completely separate.

My second piece of advice is that, if you recognise the sort of situation in which  we found ourselves in your own circumstances, take care of yourself first. Alcoholics don’t change their spots, you can’t get them to clean up their act unless they choose to, and you need to look after yourself and let alcoholics make or break their lives all on their own.

When we moved to Queensland, we sent our Rover car over by transporter which was a lot cheaper than buying a new car after moving interstate (but in another sign of the bad luck hovering over us, the transporter broke down on the middle of the Nullarbor Plain!). However, repairs for Rover cars, as they’re British, were expensive to maintain (we’d been able to use a Rover-trained mechanic in Perth), so we decided to buy a second car and ended up with a Ford station wagon, in bright lemon yellow. And yes, the car turned to be a lemon. It started off well but, with our luck in Queensland, it went downhill fast.  It needed major repairs which further depleted what were becoming very meagre savings.

On 2nd July 1996 I fell and broke my leg and ankle, as I mentioned in an earlier post. I was hardly mobile, couldn’t cook, relied on Meals on Wheels at lunchtime, and Bryan – as well as driving 45 minutes to and from work in Ipswich – also had to cook in the evening. I was also not recovering well.  When I’d been admitted to hospital I’d had a raging temperature and was on intravenous antibiotics as I’d splintered the bone in my leg. Back at home, I had no energy, and I lost a lot of weight, very fast. I had packed in the booze (a story for another day!) and also had a good old dose of ‘flu within a few days of getting out of hospitals.

I’d take ages to shuffle from the sofa to the kitchen, get there soaked in sweat, take ten or so minutes to recover, make breakfast, then repeat the process back to the sofa. I’d fall into a deep sleep in the afternoons, and just felt exhausted all the time. I got a nursing friend to check out my sugar levels and they were fine. But in the month after I came home I lost a stone in weight (14 lbs, 6.3kgs). I did have the pleasure of stepping on the scales prior to the removal of my cast and then hop on after returning from hospital with a skinny, emaciated right leg to find I’d lost 6lbs instantaneously which I thought was pretty  nifty!

My husband was very impatient with me as he had always been healthy and really had a hard time handling illness of any kind. He was exhausted from driving to and fro from work and then having to cook, I was just generally exhausted, we were having arguments, and tensions between us were quite bad. I didn’t want to return to the hospital for any further antibiotic treatment as information was beginning to circulate about the dangers of antibiotic overuse and subsequent resistance. So in the end I was so tired and exhausted I went to Yvonne, my herbalist friend, and got treatment from her and her herbalist co-worker.

Yvonne, my herbalist friend, on her bike

Yvonne, my herbalist friend, on her bike

Interestingly, the night after I started treatment, I had a dream where I was walking up a hill, reached the peak, then started on the downhill walk. Along the way I saw a cottage with the lights on in the window. I looked through and saw two women there who beckoned me in and fed me as I sat at the table. I mentioned this to Yvonne and she was dead pleased, saying it was a sign I was on the mend.  She was right too.  It was a slow process but I gradually began to regain my strength although I wasn’t fully mobile again until about a year later. However, I’ve never really returned to being the full quid since I had that fall, and I’ve read that quite often something traumatic like that as you get older can affect your subsequent health.

I had returned to fairly good health by December 1996 when one day I walked out of our home one day to drive into Boonah and saw Bryan sitting in the carport looking grey, exhausted and absolutely dreadful.  Yes, folks, our bad luck continued. He had received several large mosquito bites when working at a nearby town.  We didn’t take too much notice at the time, but they heralded the onset of Ross River fever for Bryan.My active husband could hardly move and is thin and wiry at the best of times, but within months of copping this illness he’d gone down to six stone and looked like a skeleton.

Olive Tree, Water, Stars

A SYNCHRONISTIC MEETING WITH YVONNE, THE HERBALIST (4)

In her lovely book “Eat, Pray, Love”, Elizabeth Gilbert introduces the one person with his true name in the following way: “Ladies and Gentlemen, Richard from Texas has arrived”.

So now I’d like to announce in similar fashion, that Yvonne Tait, Herbalist and Spiritual Seeker Extraordinaire, entered my life with a colourful flourish a few months after we moved to Boonah in south-east Queensland in 1994.  She was not only a herbalist. She opened me up to the world of crystals, spirituality, colours and much more. And like so much about our time in Boonah she entered my life in a very synchronistic way.

In Perth, Western Australia, in the months prior to our move to Queensland, I had learned Reiki 1 and Reiki 11. So in Boonah when, we had got settled in our new home, I decided I’d like to start offering Reiki and contacted the local newspaper to publicise my work.  I had no idea at the time that Boonah was a hotbed of fundamentalist Christian churches. This was the town where the fundamentalists had threatened to boycott the local newspaper when it started offering horoscopes. I mean – horoscopes, for god’s sake!  Practically every mainstream newspaper offers horoscopes but in Boonah it was the work of the Devil.  So was Reiki, I was to find in due course.

I, of course, never imagined that Reiki would be regarded with suspicion and outright horror.  Reiki to me was simply a healing modality and part of the 20th century (this was 1994, remember). I found out later that the advert for Reiki sparked horror among many fundamentalist Christians who believed the Devil was walking among them. 

It’s sad that so much ignorance and fear exists about a practice which has at its heart service to those in need. Luckily for me, a couple of brave souls contacted me to have Reiki healing, and one of those left a Reiki manual for me, asking me to return it to the original owner when I’d finished.  This person was Yvonne.

I finally tracked her down to a small shed tucked away behind the main street of Boonah.  Yvonne wasn’t in her office, so I left the manual on one of the shelves in her front room. But as I turned to leave, my attention was caught by rows of beautiful, coloured bottles, lined up in a display in her office.  They looked magical, each one consisted of two colours, one over the other, and looking like a vivid rainbow glowing in small, rather ordinary-looking office.

Aura Light Harmony Bottles

Aura Light Harmony Bottles

 Yvonne, I was to learn, wove magic in this office.  I returned quite quickly as I was so curious about the coloured bottles.  I’d learned about the power of colour a few years earlier. After my mother’s death from lung cancer, I had become seriously depressed and was really hitting the booze.  My weight had crept up and I looked like the half-side of a bus. As I said in an earlier post, I could have auditioned for the Incredible Hulk and won the part easily.

I always wore black because I thought black made me look slimmer.  But I had seen some information on colour at the centre where I’d learned Reiki and it interested me no end. Also, on the last afternoon of my Reiki 1 course, I’d walked out and seen a little butterball of a woman walking along the street in front of me dressed in black.  I looked at her and thought: “She looks like a fat woman trying to look slim in a black outfit, and she still looks fat”. And, of course, I looked at myself and thought: “And you, my dear, look just the same, a tallish woman dressing in black to look slim and you still look fat.”  So I went out the next day and bought the most beautiful, coloured dress I could find.  It was multi-coloured and multi-patterned and quite eye-watering! Bryan called it my “Ken Done dress”, Ken Done being an Australian artist who works with bright patterns and colours. The experience of wearing colour really hit me.  I felt quite different, more people smiled at me, and one woman actually walked up to me and told me how much she loved my dress and all the colours. It made my day!

Yvonne - In her '70s and a walking advertisement for her work as a herbalist.

Yvonne – In her ’70s and a walking advertisement for her work as a herbalist.

Finally I met Yvonne, who was in her office the next time I visited the premises where she worked. She was a short, dark-haired woman with a huge, welcoming smile and a very warm, healing presence.  I asked her for a reading as I was so curious about the coloured bottles which, I found, were part of a system of healing called Aura Light. I remember I chose four bottles with quite intense colours. Yvonne told me afterwards, that the first bottle represented childhood, predominant programs for life purpose and links to the past. The second bottle was about life’s obstacles and challenges in your teenage years. The third bottle relates to the here and now on all levels. And the final, fourth bottle, represents future potential, the future and correlating the past and present.

I didn’t know at the time but these are multi-layered bottles which reflect back to you where you are at any stage of your life.  So while one reading might be about where your are currently and how you’re working through particular issues, another reading will provide further information which reveal another layer of your life and how you’re living it.

 I remember doing another one of my jaw drops as Yvonne proceeded into the first reading I ever had, because she honed in on my difficult relationship with my father. At that stage, she knew nothing about him or my dysfunctional relationship with him.  I was absolutely amazed.  And in subsequent readings, I’d pick what I thought were quite different bottles and Yvonne would look then murmur: “Hmmmm, your father’s been stuffing you around again, hasn’t he?  What’s he been up to this time?”

My work with Yvonne didn’t stop there.  We connected really well and she asked me to go with her when she did workshops at various places, either to talk about herbalism or about Aura Light.  She also opened up the world of spirituality to me with her amazing range of books which she generously lent me.  I was sucking all this up like someone who’d been without a drink for a week and now was busy guzzling greedily from the fount of nourishment, which for me was spirituality in all its various guises.

 Yvonne also helped me with the herbal tinctures she gave me and dietary advice.  I started losing weight and began exploring all the books and manuals this warm, caring lady had in her office.

And then I met her daughter Joy.  Joy came for a visit from Coffs Harbour where she was living at the time.  We picked her up from the airport and she started talking about the small angels she’d seen holding up the plane she’d travelled up on as it had hit bad turbulence landing at Brisbane Airport.  I remember sighing inwardly to myself and thinking: “Oh, god, another member of Flakes Anonymous”, although I kept that to myself. But I was wrong and I’m glad I didn’t open my big gob and shoot off about my blockheaded prejudices.

Joy opened me up to crystals.

She brought with her the most beautiful necklaces she’d created of various crystals. When she pulled them out and displayed them, I could feel my senses tingling and an awareness I’d never had opening up. I eventually chose a necklace in pearl and citrine and I really felt, for the first time in my life, like a very powerful empress when I slipped it around my neck.

Joy looked at me and said: “But you know how the crystals talk to you, don’t you?” with such confidence and with such a brilliant smile on her face, that I simply said “Yes”, although I had no idea what she was talking about.  It just felt churlish to say “no” in the face of such faith and belief in me and my supposed abilities with crystals – particularly as I’d never done or experienced anything like this before.

The first crystal which made me aware of my connection with crystals.

 But she was right.  Yvonne offered to let me sell crystals in her shop and I agreed, because for some reason the crystal jewellery that Joy had created, and which she left with her mother to sell, just fascinated me. I could feel their power and how each necklace offered different energies to the people who bought them. We met up with Joy at Byron Bay and went to a crystal warehouse.

It was like entering Aladdin’s Cave!  I had not the faintest knowledge of crystals, but I whizzed around that magical palace and picked exactly which crystals I wanted to take back with me to sell: clear quartz, citrine, carnelian, and many others. I didn’t have much spare cash, so I was quite focused on particular stones which seemed to me to draw me. I remember Yvonne wandering up with a number of small, polished, clear quartz points and unhesitatingly I went to one and said: “That’s mine!”  I had no idea why this particular stone attracted me but since then, it’s always how I’ve operated with crystals. They communicate with me at some unseen level, at a higher dimension than I’m unable to explain. I still have this little polished point which has travelled to the UK, back to Western Australia, to New South Wales, down to Victoria, back to NSW and now has a home in North Cyprus!

When I set up my little display in Yvonne’s shop, the various crystals sold like hot cakes.  I was hooked!  Who would have thought I’d ever be working with crystals! In my next post I’ll talk about crystals, my work with them and how I work intuitively with crystals, rocks and stones. Note: this might be a long post as crystals are my passion!

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